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20121130
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Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
positioned along the border with gaza. a visit to gaza by egypt's prime minister failed to stop the bombardment and pull the region from the brink of all-out war. u.s. officials blame hamas for starting this conflict. but they are also urging to be measured in its response. the defense secretary leon panetta says israel and the palestinians need to negotiate a more permanent piece -- his words, a more permanent piece in the region. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr's been watching what's going on. barbara, what is the u.s. military most concerned about right now? >> wolf, as they watch that call-up of 75,000 israeli reservists, that is the concern. is this leading to a ground war? we've talked to officials here who say the major concern israel will move in on the ground. and that will be a significant escalation that will reverberate throughout the region. so here's the calculation. how far will hamas go in continuing its rocketed mortar attacks into israel? they know that if they pull back, the israelis presumably will pullback and this dangerous escalation can be avoide
jazeera reporting that the ceasefire is going to be announced this evening in cairo. now egypt will reportedly be agreeing to oversee this plan which is said to include an easing of the crossroads into gaza. so peace appears to be eminent but what do you make of the transparency of what the outline of it deal is? >> well, i think we still need to see it implemented. having spent a lot of time in the middle east, done a lot of negotiations, one thing i know about this part of the world, nothing is concluded until you actually see it carried out. it's one thing to talk about it. it's something else to do it. so let's actually see the ceasefire take hold. what i'm hearing is that by midnight their time, which would be around 5:00 our time, that's when it might actually take hold. so if it does, that will be the first step. then the question will be how real is it, number one. number two, what are its real elements? if there is some easing of movement into gaza, what are the commitments that hamas is undertaking to ensure there will not only be no fire out of gaza but also is there
with benjamin netanyahu and then to ramallah to meet with palestinian leaders and finally to cairo, egypt. the president was up late last night talking to netanyahu and mohamed morrissey. this morning chuck asked ben rhodes whether clinton is going because talks are stuck or a diplomatic resolution is close at hand. >> she is going because we've been in discussions with these leaders and we want to carry those forward. and obviously the center of gravity for those discussions is in the region. i don't want to predict what the outcome of those discussions will be. we know how difficult the situation is, how charged the issue of gaza is. we've seen conflict there in the past. so this is a difficult challenge. but, again, it's worth the effort of leaders from the united states in the region and interfashionly. >> chuck joins us now from cambodia where he is traveling with the president. chuck, a lot of moving and fast moving parts here. what can you tell us? what's the latest? >> i can tell you what aides will say in answer it to that question off answer. certain things you can say on camera
krueger. clashes in cairo today, more protests in tahrir square against egypt's president morsi. we'll have a live report. move over george clooney the on yan's kim junge un the sexiest man alive and beijing doesn't get the joke. good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. no joke today on capitol hill. ambassador susan rice's attempt to clear the air with republicans over benghazi did not work as the white house had hoped. senators mccain, ayotte and graham say they have more questions than they had before rice's comments about benghazi. >> we are significantly troubled by many of the answers that we got and some that we didn't get it. >> if you don't know what happened just say you don't know what happened. people can push you to give explanations and you can say i don't want to give bad information. >> that's troubling to me as well, why she wouldn't have asked, i'm the person that doesn't know anything about this, i'm going on every single show. >> joining me now for our daily fix, chris cizilla, msnbc contributor managing editor of post politics.com and our own nbc capito
of israel and hamas are in egypt separately for peace talks. hamas issuing its demand for a cease-fire. they want israel to end a long-running military blockade of gaza immediately. the carnage from the last 24 hours, arwa damon is in gaza city. >> reporter: the large slab of concrete and mangled metal finally gives way. buried beneath it, another lifeless body. it's the second child we've seen. there was also a baby. others in the neighborhood say the blast killed all ten people who lived here. israel says it was targeting a man who heads a rocket launch unit. people we spoke with said they never heard of him. this was a family home. >> people here are telling us that so far those who have been killed in this strike have been women and children. and they have not been able to find any survivors. just moments ago, from that back corner, they did pull out the body of a tiny child. an over here there's another frantic effort under way. tempers easily flare as frustration and anger mount. >> she's my uncle's wife, this young man shouts. rage coupled with sorrow etched across his face
hillary clinton has obviously been very busy moving between jerusalem, the west bank, egypt. nbc's stephanie gosk is live in tel aviv. what are you hearing about the cease fire? >> reporter: you know, we were on the cusp of a cease-fire it seemed like last night and it seemingly fell apart. however, we did hear from israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu that they still want a diplomatic solution, which is a real sign that at the very least the negotiations are still going on. we know that secretary clinton is shuttling back and forth throughout the region trying to make that happen. it's complicated today, chris, by this bus blast in jerusalem. there were at least 11 people injured, several of them seriously. officials here are calling it a terrorist attack although not a suicide attack. and as you know, it will be a familiar scene on the ground here in israel for people in tel aviv and all across the country. this was a tactic used a lot by palestinian militants about a decade ago. in recent years they haven't seen it. the last bus blast was back in 2004. and just soon after
taking place in cairo between egypt, egyptian intelligence officials, including senior leaders of the palestinian faction. they are trying to come up with a loose plan. they are still some sticking points whether or not that would be agreed upon but there are positive signs as it has been described by egypt's prime minister in an interview he gave to news agency in cairo. meanwhile, here inside gaza, operations are still ongoing. the israeli air force has carried out dozens of strikes across the gaza strip. palestinian rockets have gone off from gaza into southern israel. there is that incident you referred to yesterday on sunday there was an israeli air strike that targeted one residential building in which 12 people were inside. ten of those from a single family including four children. israel says that house belonged to a leading member of hamas and the campaign over the past several days suggest they are perhaps now targeting the specific homes of some of the leaders in hamas' military wing and political echelon. >> let's turn to stephanie gosk. >> reporter: the view here i
after it began. the truce was brokered by egypt and ended eight days of fighting. the big question is, will it last. we have reporters throughout the region for you. martin fletcher is in tel aviv, and jim is in cairo. but we begin in gaza. this truce was marked by a huge celebration there in gaza today. tell us about it. >> that's true. in fact, tens of thousands of palestinians showed up in gaza city. and actually in cities all across the gaza strip to hear from various leaders of all of the palestinian factions. the biggest one was by far and large in gaza city. some leaders we haven't heard in the past eight days, many in hiding, came out today to address the thousands of people who gathered. they're portraying this and describing this as a victory. they say for the first time hamas has not only defeated israel, but has also shown the world what they're about against a back drop of changes taking place all across the arab world. they also sent a message to the united states saying that they should, the united states should support the palestinian people and not the occupation. ham
's strategic interest, is also important to egypt. they have a very difficult time in economic terms, and let's not forget that the revolution there was indigenous, it was local and it was, in large part, over domestic issues, jobs, education, health care, what concerns people everywhere. he needs a stable situation there. he needs to concentrate on economic growth, providing jobs. he obviously has to recognize and acknowledge public opinion, which is an important factor there as here. but, for now, i think it's a positive step. what he's done with respect to the ceasefire. >> you saw a reporter in gaza who talked about the many celebrations throughout the day on thursday there. has hamas emerged stronger from this last eight days of the conflict? there are those who suggest that's the case? >> clearly, yes. and a dangerous signal is being sent throughout the entire region. palestinians are split. the palestinian authority, which controls the executive branch of government as a result of their election several years ago, is opposed to violence. they took the position we favor, nonviolent nego
and israel, that eight-day bombardment of rockets going back and forth and egypt having to step in to broker a peace deal, do you think that if the u.n. recognizes statehood that palestine and palestinians and israeli negotiations would be better suited to coming up to a longer standing two-state solution? >> to get a state that will have only through negotiations. they know it. we know it. united states knows it. all the europeans know it. after the operations in gaza they feel maybe -- they have to encourage him and do everything to -- maybe help him. they had like to help him by the recognition today. it's a meaningless resolution. to get a state should be only through negotiations. all of us knows it. we are trying to negotiate with them since we took power. not only us. the former prime minister offered them almost everything. 98.5% of the territory. they didn't say yes. when barak was prime minister of israel, he offered the same to arafat and arafat said yes -- said no. so now since we took power, they put any obstacle they could in order to resume the negotiations. first they ask pri
on his side? chris van hollen will join us live. plus, another day of deadly protests in cairo over egypt's president morsi's new sweeping powers that he is seeking. we'll get a live report. plus, the former head of florida's republican party, he's making a stunning claim about the state's early voting law saying it was deliberately designed to suppress minority votes. it's just one of the things we thought you should know. join our conversation on twitter. you can find us at @tamronhall and at @newsnation. a winter wonderland doesn't just happen. it takes some doing. some coordinating. and a trip to the one place with the new ideas that help us pull it all together. from the things that hang and shine... ...to the things that sparkle and jingle. all while saving the things that go in our wallet. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. get fresh cut savings. live trees are arriving weekly. now's a good time to think about your options. are you looking for a plan that really meets your needs? and your budget? as you probably know, medicare only covers about 80% of your
. >> second term shuffle. as they say. here we go. >> yes, it is. >>> new demonstrations set across egypt with tension growing over president morsi's recent power grab. protesters tossed molotov cocktails at police in cairo's tahrir square as they rallied against morsi's decision last week to seize absolute power and put himself above judicial review. now, some morsi supporters canceled a competing rally in cairo, hoping to diffuse anger and tension. >>> also mourners have gathered at the burned out factory in bangladesh to remember the workers who died there. at least 110 people were killed and dozens injured in a fire after the disaster armed police were at the factory in order to maintain some order. workers rights' groups are hoping global outrage about safety conditions at factories throughout bangladesh will lead to some lasting and much-needed changes. >>> well, the federal government has shut down the nation's largest organic peanut butter processor over concerns of salmonella salmonella poisoning. fda inspectors found salmonella all over sunland's new mexico processing plant. the
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)